Biography of Father Wiktor Szutowicz

Description:
Born October 27, 1890, in Shutovichi, Ashmyany county, Vilnius province. He was a Roman Catholic priest, a pedagogue, and a publicist. He studied at Ashmyany city school. From 1909 he was a cleric [seminarian] of the Diocese of Vilnius. During his studies he joined the Belorussian cultural enlightenment movement. Ordained June 16, 1913, in Vilnius. He continued his studies at his own expense at the Seminary in St. Petersburg. After the Bolsheviks came to power he had to cease his studies. He served as administrator at the parish in Borodzienicze, Braslaw region (Belarus) from 1917 to 1927. He disseminated Belorussian religious publications among his parishioners and organized several Belorussian-language schools. He was persecuted for his activities by Polish church and secular authorities and criticized in the Polish press. From 1925 his activities came under investigation several times. For some time he was deprived of the right to manage his parish independently. From 1927 he served as vicar in the Polish parish in Trzcianne. In 1929 he went to the United States, where he remained until August 1932. After his return he was appointed vicar in Choroszcz (outside Biaƚystok). He contributed [articles] to Belorussian secular and religious periodical publications. He wrote a play entitled “950 Years of Christianity in Belarus.” He remained in Choroszcz until 1943. After the retreat of the Germans he left for Minsk, where he became pastor of the Cathedral of the Holy Name of Mary. Arrested November 26, 1945, convicted, and sent to the camps in Komi ASSR. Released in 1956. Returned to Belarus where he spent the last years of his life as pastor in Barysaw, where he died March 1, 1960. Source: No source given
Variant Names:
Szutowicz, Wiktor; Shutovich, Viktor
Dates:
1890-1960
Locations:
Ashmi︠a︡ny (Belarus); Vilnius (Lithuania); Saint Petersburg (Russia); Braslaŭ (Belarus); Trzcianne (Poland); United States; Choroszcz (Poland); Minsk (Belarus); Komi (Russia); Barysaŭ (Belarus)
Subjects:
male; clergy and religious; survived