Biography of Father Wojciech Olszowski

Description:
Born March 18, 1916, in Żywiec, Kraków voivodeship (Poland). Graduated from the gymnasium in Żywiec and from Lwów Seminary and was ordained in 1939. He was vicar of the parish in Bolekhiv, outside Stryi, and also tended parishes in Bukachivtsi and Burshtyn, outside Rohatyn; was there at the time of the Soviet and German occupations. November 23, 1949 – after the return of the Red Army and establishment of Soviet rule – Fr. Wojciech was arrested in Stanisƚawów (Ivano-Frankovsk). October 25, 1949 – sentenced under Article 54-10(2) of the Criminal Code of the Ukrainian SSR to ten years in corrective labor camp [Special Board, USSR Ministry of State Security]. Sent to Peschanlag (Karaganda); August 12, 1955 – transferred to Karlag, where he clandestinely ministered as a priest. July 18, 1956 – released from camp. Returned to Ivano-Frankovsk, where he also tended the parishes in Zhmerinka, Brailov, Chechelnyk and Krasnoe. In 1957 he was appointed titular bishop of Atriba and Apostolic Administrator of Ukraine. The bull with his appointment was sent by post, but intercepted by the authorities, after which Fr. Wojciech was deported to Poland. He served in the Diocese of Wrocƚaw – first, as vicar of the cathedral in Wrocƚaw, and then from 1960 he was dean in Gƚogów; from 1968 he was administrator of the parish in Biedrzychowice Górne, Bogatynia. He was never consecrated bishop, because he never knew of his appointment. He learned of it only in Poland, from representatives of Polish State Security, when he attempted to obtain a foreign passport. April 21, 1972 – died in Bogatynia. Source: Archive of the Directorate of the Ukrainian Ministry of the Interior; Dzwonkowski and Pałyga, pp. 203-204; list compiled by R. Dzwonkowski, SAC; Madała, p. 118
Variant Names:
Olszowski, Wojciech; Ol'shovskiĭ, Voĭt︠s︡ekh Antonovich
Dates:
1916-1972
Locations:
Żywiec (Poland); L'viv (Ukraine); Bolekhiv (Ukraine); Qaraghandy (Kazakhstan); Wrocław (Poland); Bogatynia (Silesia, Lower (Poland and Germany))
Subjects:
male; clergy and religious; survived