Biography of Father Adolf Kukuruzinski

Description:
Born in 1894 in Witawa, Winnica district, Podolski province. Graduated from Żytomierz Seminary and was ordained in 1917. From 1917 he was vicar of the parish in Pƚoskirów; in 1927 he graduated from Catholic University in Lublin with a doctorate in canon law. From 1927 he was pastor of the parish in Beresteczko; he taught at the Jesuit’s Pontifical Oriental [Eastern Rite] Seminary in Dubno, and later became a religion teacher in Łuck, Wƚodimierz Woƚyński, and Ostróg. From 1932 he served in the Łuck Diocesan Curia and in the Episcopal Court. He was a prison chaplain and assistant director of the diocesan branch of “Catholic Action” in Łuck; was there at the time of the Soviet and German occupations. In July 1941 he became the Vicar General of Łuck Diocese for the territory of the Kamieniec Diocese; and he led the reestablishment of the structure of the Catholic Church there. On December 28, 1944 – after the return of the Red Army and establishment of Soviet rule – Fr. Adolf was arrested in Kamieniec Podolski. December 18, 1946 – sentenced under Article 54-1(a) of the Criminal Code of the Ukrainian SSR to ten years in corrective labor camp [Special Board, USSR Ministry of State Security]. October 14, 1947 – arrived at the Inta sector of Minlag (Inta, Kozhvinsk region, Komi ASSR); released April 12, 1955. Departed for Baranovski region of Zhytomyr oblast, and then later, to Poland. Worked in the Episcopal Court in Opole. In 1960 he became chaplain for two women’s religious congregations [Sisters of the Mother of God, who taught in schools, and a community of Franciscan Sisters who worked in hospitals] in Prótkow [Prutkov], outside Opole, where he died on November 23, 1970. Source: Archive of the Directorate of Internal Affairs, Komi Republic; list compiled by R. Dzwonkowski, SAC; Madała, p. 93
Variant Names:
Kukuruzinski, Adolf; Kukuruzinskiĭ, Adol'f Feliksovich
Dates:
1894-1970
Locations:
Vinnyt︠s︡i︠a︡ (Ukraine); Z︠H︡ytomyr (Ukraine); Lublin (Poland); Berestechko (Ukraine); Lut︠s︡ʹk (Ukraine); Opole (Poland)
Subjects:
male; clergy and religious; survived